40th Post Graduate Course & 54th Annual Meeting

of the European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR)
18–22 June 2018, Berlin/Germany
Conference chair: Prof. Dr. Franz Wolfgang Hirsch

Sights

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Brandenburg Gate

The Brandenburg Gate is made of sandstone and is the only remaining gate of Berlin. It used to represent the separation between eastern and western Berlin. After the fall of the wall in 1989 the gate became a symbol for German Unity.

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East Side Gallery

Another symbol for the separation of Germany are the remains of the Berlin Wall. Some can be seen near Ostbahnhof station at the East Side Gallery. The longest still remaining part of the Berlin Wall is an art exhibition. 105 paintings from artists all over the world are painted on the east side of the wall and might be the largest and longest-lasting open air gallery worldwide.

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Berlin Cathedral

In 1894 the construction of the Berlin Cathedral started and was finished in 1905. After WWII the restoration started in 1975 and was finished in 1993 so you can now marvel at the magnificence of the dome again. You can see the ministry church, the baptismal and matrimonial chapels, the imperial staircase, the Hohenzollern crypt and the Cathedral museum.

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German Chancellery

In 2001 the German Chancellery (Bundeskanzleramt) became main seat of the executive office of the German chancellor. The building was designed by Charlotte Frank and Axel Schultes and is often referred to as “Bundeswaschmaschine” (federal laundry machine) or "Elefantenklo" (elephant loo) because of its distinctive architecture.

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Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-00821 via Wikimedia Commons

Jewish Cemetery

The Old Jewish Cemetery on Grosse Hamburger Straße was built in 1672 and destroyed during World War II when it was also used as a holding place for Jews waiting for their deportation to concentration camps. The cemetery was re-opened in 2008 and it is estimated that a total of about 12,000 Jewish citizens lie buried there.

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Alexanderplatz and Television Tower

Germany's largest square - the Alexanderplatz - was converted into the pedestrian zone it is today after World War II, when it was largely destroyed. Its eyecatching landmark is the Television Tower with a height of 368 metres, which makes it the highest publicly accessible building in Europe.

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Berlin City Palace

As the royal and imperial palace of Prussia and later Germany, the Berlin City Palace (Berliner Stadtschloss) was located on the Museum Island. During World War II it was heavily destroyed and therefore demolished in 1950 by the GDR. In 2013 the reconstruction started and the completion is expected in 2019. While the City Palace is still undergoing construction, you can visit the Humboldt Box, a temporary museum right next to the building site. There you can find information about the City Place, its significance and future.

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Museum Island

Right in the heart of the city centre, you can find five world-renowned museums on an island in the river Spree. The highlights are the famous bust of Nefertit and the Pergamon altar, which will be unfortunately closed for renovation until 2019.

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More sights can be found on the homepage of Visit Berlin.

Aazarus via Wikimedia Commons

Kurfürstendamm

The Kurfürstendamm, or Ku’Damm, was the hotspot for entertainment in the 1920s as it hosted various cinemas like the Marmorhaus or the "Komödie am Kurfürstendamm".

Kurfürstendamm


Mihael Grmek via Wikimedia Commons

Potsdamer Platz

The Potsdamer Platz is not only good for its shopping possibilities but also has the first traffic signal in Germany. It was installed in 1924 when the Potsdamer Platz was a busy intersection used by buses, trams, and cars.

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Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-00821 via Wikimedia Commons

Berlin Six-Day Race

Starting in 1909, the Berlin Six-Day Race is the oldest six-day race worldwide. In the 1920s it was so popular that it was held twice a year instead of once. At the same time, football became also popular with the masses and Hertha BSC became one of the best teams in Germany.

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Wintergarten Varieté

The Wintergarten Varité on Potsdamer Strasse was opened at the beginning of the 1990s to replace the Varité on Friedrichstrasse, which was popular in the 1920s. The current program includes comedy, music, acrobatics, and dance.

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